Our Story

Heritage

Our Story

Our story begins in 1969 in Lavenham, a small village in Suffolk, England. Mrs Elliot – as she always preferred to be known – sought better quality horse rugs for her stables.

Determined to take matters into her own hands, the devoted rider began experimenting with new materials and soon created the very first nylon quilted horse rug.

By 1971, the flourishing Lavenham Rug Company relocated to larger premises and a year later, the business began producing quilted jackets to fulfil a demand for stylish, durable equestrian garments that matched both rider and horse. The brand’s iconic Raydon jacket – the prototype for quilted equestrian jackets the world over - was conceived with the sartorially aware rider in mind: slim cut, with back vents to sit over the back of a saddle, finished with a neat corduroy collar and simple press stud fastenings. Still manufactured in England, using British materials wherever possible, the styling of the jacket remains largely unchanged today.

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II presenting a Lavenham Rug to a winner at Windsor Horse Trials in the 1970’s

Creating solid foundations, centred on the principles of quality and durability, Lavenham’s fit-for-purpose styles have been embraced by fashion and equestrian audiences alike. The Suffolk outfitter’s popularity quickly spread to the sartorial streets of Italy, before a 1993 collaboration with Parisian brand A.P.C secured the first of many Japanese orders. This global appreciation has not gone unnoticed, with the brand receiving the Queen’s Award for International Trade on more than one occasion.

Today, Lavenham’s clothing offering is just as well known on the streets as it is in the stables, thanks to a series of innovative collaborations with the likes of Kenzo, Joe Casely-Hayford and iconic brand Fred Perry. Despite these successes, Lavenham remains true to its origins as an equestrian outfitter, with an unfaltering dedication to providing the best things on horseback; fit for purpose and unmistakably British.